Time Management

“The future is something which everyone reaches at the rate of 60 minutes an hour, whatever he does, whoever he is. C.S. Lewis

Do you find yourself saying or thinking things like: “I’m too busy“, “I just don’t have enough time”, “The month went so fast!” or “I could use a 25 hour day”? Do you really need more time or do you need to better manage the time you have? As C.S. Lewis points out, time is the great equalizer, we all are given 60 minutes in an hour and 24 hours in a day.

True “Time Management” is not a matter of the amount of time you have, it’s how you manage the time you’re given. Undoubtedly there are people and things in your life that you highly value. Understanding who and what they are is the key to addressing your supposed lack of time. When you clearly establish your values you are able to attach the things that you do to the things that are important to you. In this way, the things you do hold value and time is not an issue.

Here’s an exercise to make this happen. Although the following steps are simple, they will require some soul searching to accomplish. This also requires that you get absolutely clear on what you value most in life and what you do with your time. Okay, here it is:

First, write down everything you do in 24 hours. Everything. (ie, drink coffee, read newspaper, text, talk on phone, get dressed, pray, drive to work, eat lunch, check email, work on project, watch TV, etc)

Next, write down 5 things you value most in life. Think BIG- relationships, faith, work, health, people etc.

Now compare your list of your 5 top values to your daily activities.   Do your daily activities support the things you value?

If not- START ELIMINATING ACTIVITIES- one by one.

Give the above exercise a try and see how much better you feel about the 24 hours you are given each day. Here are a few extra ideas for time management:

• Do you have multiple big projects? Pick your top 3. Do the hardest one first. Give yourself a reasonable amount of time to accomplish it and move on to the next one.

• Ask for help. You don’t have to be a lone ranger. Ask a friend to help you on a project and in return you can help her with something on her list.

• Tell someone what you’re doing and ask to be held accountable.

• Take time to relax. Take a break in between projects. Breathe deeply from you abdomen. (not your chest!)

How did this go?  Were you able to cross something off your list?

 

 

Email me and let me know how it went.

renee@yourfoodfight.com